When Symptoms Change: Warning Signs to Watch For

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Key Questions
  • What are 9 dangerous conditions that cause headache?
  • When should someone go to ER?
  • Who are more at risk of a potentially dangerous secondary headache?
  • How common are serious or potentially fatal headaches?
  • What is the difference between primary and secondary headaches?
  • What does SSNOOPP mean and why is it important?
  • What are the causes of thunderclap headache?
  • What is a Chiari malformation and how does it relate to headache?
  • Does correcting a Chiari malformation improve headache?
Interview Notes

Find more about William Young, MD and his work here:

William Young

William B. Young, MD

Neurologist and Headache Specialist
Jefferson Headache Center

Dr. William Young is a world-renowned pioneer in the field of migraine. He serves as the director of the Jefferson Headache Center in Philadelphia. He instructs neurologists on headache medicine and regularly publishes research on the topic. He is board-certified in neurology, psychiatry, and headache medicine. Dr. Young is a passionate advocate on eradicating the stigma of migraine. He fights on Capitol Hill for greater funding and research on migraine. In addition to his roles at the American Headache Society and the American Academy of Neurology, he is also president of the Alliance for Headache Disorders.

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